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inability as a civil society, a nation that takes such great pride in the rule of law, to in some way come to grips with the mace of of guns and violence -- with the place of guns and violence. and before we begin this discussion, i'll just tell you one very personal anecdote. three days before the sandy hook shooting, i was in denver, colorado, on personal business. and i was driving through the denver suburbs, and i passed into aurora rah, colorado, and saw the sign and thought to myself -- as journalists often do -- oh, my god, this just disappeared from our landscape. it happened not that long ago in which a young man, now appears to be utterly deranged, b went into a movie theater and began shooting down people with an assault weapon. and it went away. the not part of the presidential debate, it was not part of the fabric of our lives, it was not part of the daily journalistic diet. so on that wednesday night i e-mailed the producer of the "meet the press" show that was coming up on that sunday in which they would be talking about big ideas that america needs to be thinking about. and
a new law that aims to clean up the use of crack cocaine. it's estimated around 1 million in brazil use the highly available and addictive drugs. not many can be force -- d. >> this is a man who refused treatment voluntarily. but for his daughter enough was enough. >> we will keep trying and trying. what i don't want is for him to die like that, because he doesn't have any more control of himself. >> and anna's father's crack addiction has caused them to live on the streets of brazil for the last two years. but now a controversial law has been passed allowing the compulsory treatment of the problem. it will stem from a judicial order when a person's life is in danger or seen as risking another's life. from there we will recommend her to a shelter where she will stay for a period of time. >> if there are 1 million crack users in the country, these described as chaotic crack land. but now officials and law enforcement agents are taking a new law to the streets. talking to one on the spot. in order to overcome this addictive drug, they say users must accept treatment which is usually not o
we ask of each citizen is to respect the law, and i think that you and the rest must take care and must beware of that. another issue, it's about syria -- >> no, let's talk about the women's issue, because it's an important one. this is not, first of all, nobody in the west is trying to get women to take their veils off. the issue as described in the arab development report written by an arab woman is that there are three great deficits in the arab world x the third one -- and the third one is the rights of women. this is written by an arab about the arab world with enormous amounts of data. by any comparison with the rest of the world, the status of women in the arab world is poor. so, you know, i think part of solving the problem and dealing with it is to acknowledge that it exists. my own humble suggestion would be that you can make this into an anti-western crusade, but the truth of the matter is the women in the arab world deserve better. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: but i have not, i have not blamed the west. i have not blamed the west, and i don'
of -- a fire and everybody's in to try to dheep from getting out of control. with the law, in the aftermath of that, there was a defining event and that was the iraq's encouraging in to kuwait. we saw the global presence put together by jim baker and george h. w. bush and the success in the engagement of it. but subsequent to that, we have seen a completely different scene. that is what i would describe as three alarmers and two alarmers. we about a dozen fires popping up here in different parts of the world within all of a sudden you have people who don't have the -- a lot of people in congress who don't have the previous reference have basically come to the conclusion that the world has changed and we can't afford nor do we have the public support for global open gaugement. -- engagement. when you talk to people back home and you say why do we give so much foreign aid? it is literally like saying, you know, you need to diet and lose a lot of weight and you get a haircut and solve the problem. the amount of foreign aid and presence now is shrinking to the point where it's relatively insign
to any particular group. this should be against the law and will be against a loss in and it needs to be stamped out. >> this woman was taken to turkey by her parents on a holiday, she said. when she was taken there, she was introduced to a magical to marry. five years later, after physical, sexual, and mental abuse, she got away. she hasn't forgotten and it does not find it easy to forgive her father. >> they took me to turkey, it wasn't explained. i never even knew i was going to turkey to get married. nothing was explained but even after my father apologized, the only thing he could say to me is we thought we were doing the right thing. >> the right thing based on what? >> i'm assuming based on his cultural beliefs. >> perhaps the most unpleasant aspect is that children are essentially hand over into a life of slavery by their own parents. that is why the government here want a specific criminal offense of forced marriage made law. but some of the community at the heart of this very complicated place is to try to police. campaigners against forced marriage interviewed a thousand
, the house pass a budget, senate pass a budget, as required by law and on time. so as i've talked to them, i feel pretty good about the constitutionality of the 27th amendment and how it applies to this. i would, if i could, make a couple other comments. i do think it's interesting in the spirit of bipartisanship, as you've pointed out, this was a piece of legislation for the most part pretty much mirrors what was introduced in the 112th with -- by a democrat with several other democratic co-sponsors as well as republicans here. i sort of feel like this is an effort at a bipartisan -- bipartisanship. i know sandy had to leave. we were talking about the ratings agencies and what debate. reading the executive management report from the ratings agency that also pointed to the congress that one of the reasons -- huge reason for the downgrade, they didn't feel that the congress had the political will to address the spending crisis that we are in either. so that was also a big part of the downgrade of our credit rating. now i think, you know, we are trying to exercise the political will to address
, and by french law, singles may adopt, but same-sex couples may not. an initiative is under way to change that. for these two women, that would be an important step in the right direction. hiding their relationship from the authorities and not being able to adopt as a couple was very stressful for them. >> that really was not a pleasant time. we had decided to adopt as a couple, not just me by myself. it was very frustrating to be forced to say, "i want a child" and not "we want a child." that felt very uncomfortable, as if she had no part in it. >> equal rights for same-sex uples was one of french president francois hollande's campaign promises, but these women worry the debate it has sparked could hurt their children. they prefer to shield the boys from it entirely. >> someone on the radio said a proper family is made up of a daddy and a mommy. i turned the radio off right away, but my son asked, "did you hear that? what nonsense." >> this couple are staunch catholicandake different view. they define a family as consisting of a mother, father, and children only. they say homosexual couples
, not revolution. and the only way you can do that is through the rule of law. so, national committee was put together. and they changed a third of the constitution and created independent commission for elections and a new constitut n constitutional court and many other laws. so, we took the systematic approach mainly because of my experiences being educated in the west and looking at how western systems did it it was the rule of law. i was surprised by western think tanks and the european ambassadors in our country where they say that is very difficult. you think? i mean, this has been a major challenge and you can't have this by waving a magic wand. it will take hard work so that people start to, for the next elections, vote for candidates because they're on left to right of these particular issues. so, that political party culture, that is the major challenge. and where we're starting from low down in jordan, we're still steps ahead of many countries in the middle east. so, it's going to be tough for all of us. but that's the only way that i think we can do it. >> your majesty, thank you
for this short-term extension is to just get congress to actually follow the law that congress wrote in 1974 which is to pass a budget by april 15. we're not saying what kind of budget they have to pass. just pass a budget. reason is the senate is going on four years now for not having passed a budget. we think this gives us the time we need in this nation to have a good thorough, vigorous and honest debate of what it takes to get our fiscal house in order and about how to budget. families budget. businesses budget. our federal government should budget. we actually have a law that says we should budget. all we're saying is follow that law and that's why the short- term extension before you today. i'll let the rest of it speak for itself. >> thank you very much. mr. levin. >> first, welcome, mr. chairman. >> thank you. i think this is the first -- >> i think this is the first time i have been before you. the first time any of us has been in the chair. >> thank you. i hope i'll do good enough and make you want to come back. >> i'll come back whether i want to or not. \[laughter] >> we still we
government in his negotiations at the u.n. to codify the laws against coca. what was happening, was in constant medication with the company primary for the vice president, vice pays, who really got to feel the relationship between them over time. they just had a really interesting parlay between each other. so that's the beginning of an overview of the book. i want to pass the mic back and forth and i think we're going to have questions for each other. but that's the beginning. >> at evening. i'm at the super policies were around the trip policy there. i was once asked to check to a group of high school students in the literature resume and background and came up with the topic and you had to speak to the topic. this being a high school dance, they wanted here but sex, drugs and international relations. at that home-equity type these things together. it didn't dawn on me until the last minute and i realized the way to tell that story was through the story of columbus, who i considered the granddaddy of international drug traffickers. how you see the world depends where you say,
a criminal offense under international law. so while coca-cola was guaranteed the right to use coca as a flavoring in their own product, indigenous peoples across the andes were told that the traditional practice of coca leaf chewing and drinking coca tea would no longer be tolerated by the international community. and the u.s. was the architect of these treaties, um, certainly had support from other countries. today they have key allies in their effort to maintain the treaties such as russia, japan, sweden. but it really is a u.s. instrument. so coca, along with cannabis and opium, became the main targets of the 1961 convention. this historical error, as i like to call it, was basically justified by the 1950 report of the commission of inquiry on the coca leaf which, as sanho pointed out, is a totally racist document. it's totally, totally racist, has absolutely no scientific evidence. you'll be outraged as you read it, yet it is still the basis for the international drug control convention's treatment of coca. subsequent to that in the 1990s, the u.n. world health organization, th
has just enacted one of the most inhumane laws in preventing americans from adopting russian children who clearly have -- are now deprived of an opportunity to have a better life. i don't think the status quo in syria is something we just need to have some more conversations about. i think we ought to tell the syrian people that we're either going to help them or we're not. we know that a no-fly zone and we know the supply of arms so that they can defend themselves to counter the arms that are being provided by the iranians and the iranian revolutionary guard on the ground and there's no hundreds of thousands of refugees that are putting the strain on our allies. i've had a lot of conversations. we've had a lot of hearings. we haven't done anything. we've got, again, 60,000 dead and after 22 months and all i get, frankly, from the administration is the fall of assaad is, quote, inevitable. i agree. what about what happens in the meantime? i hope that you, and i know you are deeply concerned about that situation. it's terrible. it's heartbreaking. to meet a group of young women as i si
of them or their sale or transfer. we are different from the new york state law. we don't require registration of grandfathered weapons. we are also different from the california law in that regard. in a sense, is a little bit more moderate in that regard. host: senator feinstein's judiciary committee meeting in the senate will hold a hearing on january 30 on wednesday to address gun-control. at that hearing will be wayne lapierre, executive vice president and chief executive officer of the national rifle association. one other story from today's paper on this subject is from "usa today" -- the story is in "usa today" by david jackson today. we have about five or 10 minutes left of this segment on the role of the united states on a world stage. i want to go to mike from oklahoma city, oklahoma, on the democratic line. thanks for getting up with us. caller: good morning. i was sitting here listening to some of these people on gun control. [indiscernible] he' these people calling in with all these wonderful ideas. ask them if they were ever in the military. i spent eight and a half
, as well. >> let's talk about gun laws because i know they're considering gun laws in texas that would allow swron to carry a concealed weapon on a campus. they can't do that now, right? >> reporter: it's interesting. the texas legislators have gone through this debate several times. many years ago they passed a conceal handgun law where you can hear a handgun and that's what was used in this incident. but there are places where even despite having that license you you can't carry a handgun. churches and school campuses are one of those. ironically enough, there are lawmakers in austin that want to change that aspect of the concealed handgun law here in texas and allow students to carry guns on to campus. so we'll see how this plays out in that debate, as well. >> all right. ed lavendera, thanks so much. >>> investigators say the new mexico teenager accused of murdering members of his family had hoped to go on a killing spree and die in a shoot-out with police. the 15-year-old was arrested saturday night after deputies found the bodies of his mother, father, brother and two of his sist
on the law of the sea. >>> one month has passed since a shocking gang rape in india revived a national debate out sexual violence. a group of men attacked and raped a 23-year-old woman on a bus in the indian capital new delhi. she was taken to singapore fortreatment but died from her wounds. police arrested six men for alleged involvement in the crime. they have been charged with murder and sexual assault. five of the six were taken to court on monday to enter their pleas. defense lawyers raised the possibility that one of those five is a minor. the hearing was postponed after defense lawyers called on the hearing to be open to the public. theourt is scheduled to reconvene on thursday. now, government officials have promised to do more to protect women and punish attackers. but incidents of violence have continued to come to light. nhk world's apishek dulia reports from new delhi. >> we want -- >> justice! >> reporter: public outrage has erupted across india since the new delhi gang rape incident came to light. anger is directed not only against rapists but also the government and police. peo
forget about your independence, we are here to implement sharia law and the fourth crisis of mali is of course humanitarian because it is the sahara desert. there are food problems every year so people are already moving out, looking for food and water. so you've got those four. but i think the fifth thing that should be added and i don't see it added enough is contagion. if this were happened on an island nation -- this has a great potential of destabilizing all of west africa. >> and much of europe. much of europe as a result of the proximity between the two. >> and let me just -- i want to hone in on this one crucial dynamic which is there is essentially a civil war that was largely a civil war about these ethnic division. a distinct ethnic group were fighting for self determination. they partnered with largely foreign fighters who are explicit jihadis who once they get in the partnership the jihadis threw them overboard and have taken over. >> except one of the three jihadi organizations if we're going to use that term is a tuwarig-based. so it's not like there's bad jihadis o
, because i agree with you, there ought to be given more leeway, but under current law, they were limited. host: secretary clinton before the house foreign affairs committee. your reaction from the testimony. chesapeake, virginia, pamela, independent line. caller: i'm glad to be on your show. host: glad to have you on. go ahead. caller: i have a couple of comments. regarding the republicans, their aggressiveness towards secretary clinton and their questioning i thought was appropriate for the crimes that were committed. however, on the other side of the aisle, the democrats were too accommodating and skirting the issues of the crime committed. and i think that that shows total bipartisan problems. it shows that there is still a total political posture. i think if you watched from the perspective of the viewer from television, secretary clinton each time she was questioned by a democrat, smiled and smiled with lots of gleam in her eye towards them. whereas with the republicans questioning, there was not that smile, there was not that pleasure of questioning. and the reason being is because
information about its users to law enforcement than ever before. what they're looking for and if you need to worry. >>> plus sat lake city is known for snow skiing and now smog. >> if you see it you probably don't want to be breathing it. >> we'll show you why the air is so dirty in utah this winter on "cbs this morning." >> announcer: this portion of "cbs this morning" sponsored by discipline da no calorie sweetener. splenda makes the moment yours. just before that rich sweetness touches your lips. the delightful discovery the mid-sweetening realization that you have the house all to yourself. well, almost. the sweet reward making a delicious choice that's also a smart choice. splenda no-calorie sweetener. with the original sugar-like taste you love and trust. splenda makes the moment yours. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] end your long week... with a weekend getaway. save up to forty percent on all weekend hotel stays. book by january thirty first at hiltonanyweekend.com. stouffer's is proud to make america's favorite lasagna... with hand-layered pasta, tomatoes and
-- was funded by american groups. and the law forbidding the adoption of russian children, a huge part of it was the homosexual lobby. russia was a communist nation, atheist, and these people take god serious now in these countries. host: richard, thanks for the call and thanks for adding your voice and perspective to the conversation. kevin cathcart. guest: i hardly know where to start, but first of all, there are gay people in every country in the world, and the movement for lgbt civil rights around the world are home run in these countries. they are not steered by america and american money into it is true that there are many countries where the clashes between pro- and anti-gay politics are stronger than it is in the united states today. there are also countries in the world that are ahead of the united states, places where there is merit recognition and national civil rights laws, things we are still working towards and trimming of in this country. i don't think you can say that the united states is better than everywhere else. you certainly cannot say that the united states is wo
in jewish settlements of occupied palestinian land, which is seen illegal by international law. but even that is not enough to appease some of his former supporters on the right. -- >> one report said that there was a record surge in settlement expansion, not enough for those on the right to say that he is not tough enough for the palestinians. >> israel has to be strong on their negotiations and by being weak -- this is detrimental. >> others worry that his decision to form an alliance with the older-nationalist lieberman could hurt israel overseas. >> israel is going to be under the brunt of increased international criticism and what is most dangerous is the criticism from europe and the united states, not from the people who don't particularly like us. >> benjamin netanyahu and barack obama have never been close, and the u.s. president is resigned to a difficult relationship with a more right-wing government in israel. -- >> an election watched very closely, even here on inauguration day, and prince harry is on his way home after another toward of duty in afghanistan. he has confessed
under the so-called -- the law is designed to protect the royal family from criticism, but some say they are increasingly being used as a political tool. >> when he arrived at court, he was confident. he has been in jail since he was arrested in april 2011, having been denied bail 12 times. shackle that the ankles alongside other prisoners also facing criminal charges, he hopes this is the day that is already long campaign for freedom will end. he says he is innocent and not a criminal. but he also knew that being charged with insulting the monarchy in thailand usually results in a long jail term. and that is exactly what was handed down of the criminal courts in bangkok. he was given 10 years for publishing articles in his magazine deemed offensive to the monarchy and an additional year for a separate defamation case. this verdict is another blow to thailand's human rights record and, in particular, freedom of speech, which is safeguarded by the constitution. but the magistrate overrides everything else. he did not write the articles and his legal team printing it. but when it come
eu law, the work week is limited to a maximum of 48 hours. >> workers' rights need to be protected, but it seems we have gone a little bit too far in some cases, and what we've done is restricted our competitiveness in the market. at the end of the day, if you look towards asia and china, they have not got such strict laws. >> it is a complaint voiced by many employers in britain. but the logistics company does acknowledge that the advantages of eu membership far outweigh the disadvantages. it used to treat hard to find warehouse workers, for instance. now, polish immigrants happily fill those vacancies. they say they want politicians to make the you an easier place to do business. >> it is very important that europe sees itself as competing against the rest of the world rather than competing against each other. we should not be in a battle between what the uk is doing against what ireland is doing or against what italy is doing. all we are doing -- all we're interested in is how you're up competes against the rest of the world. >> when it comes to the bottom line, the eu is a main
economy. the russian parliament about a draft law banning homosexual propaganda. there was only one deputy that voted against it in the lower house. outside, passion spilled over to scuffles on the street. police made arrests after the gay-rights supporters were insulted by opponents. steve rosenberg reports from moscow. >> ahead of the debate inside the russian parliament, there was drama outside on the street. gay-rights activists. police detained 20 people. later, military police turned their attention to the controversial bill. pass the first hearing by a huge margin. it will prohibit the spread of homosexual propaganda in the wording which presence of children. it would mean across russia public events promoting gay rights could be broken up and the organizers find -- fined. >> we see open propaganda that harms. young people will decide on their own how to live in the future and what orientation to choose. >> this draft bill sends a bad signal to society of repression and limitation of civil rights guaranteed by the constitution of the russian federation. >> several russian cities hav
, to say that he's been law enforcement for 30 years and bring back 30-year experience to this consideration of this bill, and he said this bill makes sense because drug treatment works and this is in spite of the fact we'll be battling the district attorneys along with many other arms of public safety. [laughter] >> we've got the data, we've got the facts and we know this will provide great benefit to our communities, to our neighborhoods, and to all of california. thank you for your support. [applause] >> tal, i want to go back to the question that marty posed earlier, which is in effect this idea that in order to incentivize people making the decision to seek treatment that the fear of a felony conviction or possible state prison sentence could play a positive role. you talk to a lot of people charged with crimes who are trying to make the decision of what decision to make, what is the primary motivation you see coming from them. how do they decision make on dispositions related to drug possession as a felony? >> i think that for a lot of people it does have to be a
because of law enforcement tactics and focus, you end up caught up in a system where you can never move on. you're permanently trapped and weighed down by having a felony conviction. the reason i call it a war on crumbs is the type of people we see at the hall of justice, i brought with me some props. i brought with me a sweetener packet. this is a gram of sweetener. most of the time this is on the high end of the amount of narcotics we see people in possession of. sometimes people have two or three sweetener packages on them and we call them drug dealers, you know. that's why we call it a war on crumbs because the amounts we are talking about are mine us schedule. -- minnesota us schedule. the fact -- are miniscule. and based on less than a packet of sweetener, to me is outrageous. and to me this is a positive first step, in my opinion, because at least you remove some of the stigma attached to this type of issue which in my opinion should be a public health issue. it's a public health issue for a certain segment of the community and should be a public health community issue for everybody
to the rule of law and to see yourself as servants of people of the nation. we did not do that to the degree that we needed to, i think. i believe he focused exclusively on technical. -- i believe we focused exclusively on technical. there are other countries across the continent and across the globe where we have enduring relationships where the military has performed admirably when the nation has been stressed. tunisia comes to mind as an example as a place where the military was under great pressure, but performed very effectively during the revolution. there is a lot to be learned from that. from the head quarters location , it was practical to be frank. the facilities were right there. it made sense to operate from germany where we are today in good facilities with good access to africa through the civilian air force that are in europe. it keeps us in generally the same time zones as our africa partners. it is a good location for us to operate. there was early on consideration of the command headquarters relocated somewhere in africa. we are no longer considering that. where we are is t
's called bibles, badges and business. it's a group of church leaders, including evangelical pastor, law enforcement officials and small business leaders that will press for immigration reform on the local level, the grassroots level, and some of these grassroots leaders, as well as other advocates, con firmed to me that the white house has its own legislation, its own immigration reform bill, that it has been writing for some time now, very detailed, but it is unclear whether that will ever see the light of day, wolf, now that the senate has come out with its own proposal, wolf. >> dana, is it an accident that the senators were unveiling their plan on this day? >> no, it's not. it's because of what jessica was talking about. the president planning a major address on this issue tomorrow. i am told by multiple sources in both parties that these bipartisan senators wanted to get out today in order to signal to everybody out there, but perhaps most importantly, to republicans who may be on the fence about supporting a bipartisan effort, that this is independent of what the president is doin
anders, senior legislative council at the american civil liberties union. the a.c.l.u. has filed law-suits against the government challenging the legal basis for the drone program. welcome to both of you. i want to start, seth, with the effectiveness question. how effective are drones strikes? >> i think on the one hand, drones have been effective in taking off the battle field several individuals that have been actively involved in plotting attacks against the u.s. homeland. all of them plotting active attacks and the drone strikes severely disrupted those attacks. i would also say, though, that they are not sufficient. strikes in and of themselves don't hold territory. they don't deal with the root causes of terrorism. so one should never argue-- or it would be incorrect to argue that they are sufficient to ending how terrorist dwriewps operate orinding terrorism. >> brown: do you dispute the effectiveness in taking out some of the top leaders? >> the truth is that no one really knows exactly what's going on with their effectiveness or not because this is a program that has been wr
: coming up, he was once in charge of enforcing the strictest gun laws in the country. so why does our next guest say the president's gun plan might fuelly help criminals? >> steve: that's right. then does this scene look familiar? is this victoria secret super model trying out to be the next pond girl? >> gretchen: i just bought that swim suit. seriously. the boys use capital one venture miles for their annual football trip. that's double miles you can actually use. tragically, their ddy got sacked by blackouts. but it's our tradition! that's roughing the card holder. but with the capital one venture card you get double miles you can actually use. [ cheering ] any flight, anytime. the scoreboard doesn't lie. what's in your wallet? hut! i have me on my fantasy team. but for most of us it represents something more. it's the time of year that we have all waited for. when we sit on the edge of our seats for four quarters. it represents players reaching a childhood dream. the biggest stage there is in sports. a time when legacies are made. where a magical play can happen every snap, and you rem
janet napolitano today called on congress' overhaul the country's immigration laws and create a pathway to citizenship for people in the country illegally. she spoke of the woodrow wilson center about the holistic the department's agenda and the president's second term. secretary napolitano was introduced by jane harman who is the president of the wilson center. >> good morning. >> good morning. >> i'm jane harman, director and president, ceo of the wilson center, and i want to a special welcome the chairman of the board, outboard, my boss, member of, and the members of the world trade council and alliances. it's an honor to cohost this event with the aspen institute, and to welcome ambassadors from bulgaria, canada, costa rica, the czech republic, and arab states, and maybe others. unlike the washington monument or the lincoln memorial, the wilson center is a living memorial to our 20th presiden president. who studied congress, this center was chartered by congress in 1968, and we claim to offer a safe political space for independent research and open dialogue that lisa actionable idea
are treated like anyone else under the law. for if we are truly created equal, then sure lit love we commit to one another must be equally as well. >> reporter: foreign policy was noticeably absent from his address though he harolded a decade of war, touting a recovering economy and acknowledged the lessons still ahead. >> the commitments we make to each other, these things do not sap our nation. they strengthen us. >> reporter: he gave mitt romney this line. >> they do not make us a nation of tears. ♪ la >> reporter: filling the air what patriotism, kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ the brave there was a poem and prayers. as he left the west front of the capitol, a nostalgic turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look out one more time. >> now there were shades of the campaign that the president winning out, success can't mean that a few people are making it and a growing number are barely scratching by. the president acknowledging that bipartisan -- or the lack of bipartisanship here in washington but noted that everyone needs to work together for the good of the cou
that are all the things that help move countries from poverty to wealth making sure the proper root of law accountability free plat -- press property rights and we will be making the argument in the g8 we need greater transparency about land ownership companies in greater transparency about tax. these are arguments that britain will be pushing in and. sneak will the prime minister confirm that the first government for 30 years not to offer hard-pressed consumers a government-funded energy efficiency scheme following the closure of -- >> eco-scheme which is many times the size of the warm front. in eco-could help up to 230 families a year so it's potentially a better scheme. >> what assessments has the prime minister made of unemployment in my constituency and in particular more women and and -- speeding the point the honorable gentleman makes is absolutely right. there are now more people employed in the private sector than ever before and there are also more women employed in our country than ever before. when you look at the employment figures that have come out today what is remarkable
budgets annually, as the law requires. they have laid out their priorities for the public to see their plans to control spending could save our most important social programs from collapse. to reform an outdated and anticompetitive tax code, and to streamline government bureaucracies that are literally suffering job creation. they have done their jobs while senate democrats have tried to keep their priorities secret. now, we know senate democrats don't like the house budgets, and we know they don't even support the president's budgets, at least not with their votes. what we haven't known for nearly four years is what they're for, because they have refused to put their plans for the country down on paper and actually vote for them. now it's my hope that the democratic sudden interest in passing a budget isn't just another attempt to actually raise taxes. as i've said repeatedly, we're done with the revenue issue. the president has already said that the so-called rich are now paying their -- quote -- "fair share" -- end quote, and of course middle-class families are already on the
day. and doug mcelway with more from washington. >> harris, a change in gun laws after the sandy hook massacre is beginning to meet realities. and rand paul is proposing to introduce to nullify. and dianne feinstein-- >> leader reid intends to make guns one of the earliest things we consider on the floor and chairman leahy talk about hearings right away i think you're going to see action quickly. >> some doubt that. there are 20 democratic seats up for grabs in the year 2014 including in the gun friendly states of arkansas, alaska, iowa, louisiana, colorado, new hampshire and south dakota. after the assaults weapons ban in 1994 democrats lost control of the house, all of which suggests compromise may be in the works. >> we don't expect it all to pass or in its current forms. we think that there are elements of it-- >> anding this a moment we can do something about mental health, information sharing, maybe background checks and or things as well, but it has to be a plan that could possibly work or president won't get it done. >> other republicans suggest that a new assault weapons ban
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